This entry is part 18 of 20 in the series Marriage Legalities
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Are the parties related? on the NOIM

By Published On: June 11, 2022Categories: Marriage Legalities
This entry is part 18 of 20 in the series Marriage Legalities

Item 10 on the Notice of Intended Marriage (NOIM) asks “Are the parties related?”. There’s the option to tick No, or to tick Yes and then to state the relationship. What is the meaning of this question in relation to marriage?

Prohibited relationships

I’ve written before about one of the requirements for couples to marry in Australia: they must not be in a prohibited relationship. This means you can’t marry your:

  • grandparent
  • parent
  • sibling
  • child
  • grandchild.

You CAN, however, marry your:

Stating your relationship

So when the NOIM asks whether the parties are related, it’s checking to ensure they’re not in a prohibited relationship. It’s absolutely not a deal breaker to tick Yes to this item and list your relationship as pibling/nibling or cousins. It is a deal breaker to tick Yes and list your relationship as one of the prohibited ones above.

One relationship that does not need to be listed

“Fiance” is not a relationship that needs to be listed on the NOIM. Yes, I have seen it happen. No, it is absolutely not required. This question is asking about familial relationships, not love ones.

Side note if you’re interested…

In New Zealand, far more relationships are prohibited in the context of marriage. There are more legally defined relationships that are prohibited, not just immediate blood or adoption ones. On the other side of the Tasman Sea, you can’t marry your:

  • grandparent
  • parent
  • child
  • grandchild
  • sibling
  • parent’s sibling (i.e. aunt/uncle/pibling)
  • sibling’s child (i.e. niece/nephew/nibling)
  • grandparent’s spouse or civil union partner
  • parent’s spouse or civil union partner
  • spouse’s or civil union partner’s parent
  • spouse’s or civil union partner’s grandparent
  • spouse’s or civil union partner’s child
  • spouse’s or civil union partner’s grandchild.
  • child’s spouse or civil union partner
  • grandchild’s spouse or civil union partner.

The prohibitions even extend to ex-spouses and civil union partners! I think we need to bring this list in here, where it’s still legal to marry your parent’s identical twin.

More information

Click here for a full overview of the legal requirements of marriage in Australia.

Click on this link to find all the posts in my series about marriage legalities.

Click on this link to find all the posts in my series about Australian wedding ceremonies.

If you’re a celebrant wanting help with all things celebrancy, come and join us at the Celebrant Institute!

Series Navigation<< Date and place of birth on the NOIMParents’ details on the NOIM >>

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Series Navigation<< Date and place of birth on the NOIMParents’ details on the NOIM >>